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FILE -In this May 8, 2008 file photo, blank U.S. Treasury checks are seen on a roll at the Philadelphia Financial Center, which disburses payments on behalf of federal agencies, in Philadelphia. Millions of older Americans who rely on federal benefits will get a 1.7 percent increase in their monthly payments next year, the government announced Wednesday. It’s the third year in a row the increase will be less than 2 percent. The annual cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, affects payments to more than 70 million Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees. That’s more than a fifth of the country. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Social Security benefits to go up by 1.7 percentSocial Security benefits to go up by 1.7 percent next year; third straight year for tiny bump
The Associated Press24 minutes ago
Democratic chair: Election is 'neck and neck'Democratic chair Wasserman-Schultz calls Nov. 4 election campaign for Senate 'neck and neck'
The Associated Press2 hours ago
Gov't seeks supplies for immigration documentsSignal of Obama's plans? Government seeks supplies for millions more immigration documents
The Associated Press2 hours ago
FILE - In this June 1, 2005 file photo, former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee leaves the Washington Post building in Washngton. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to the Washington Post.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
Ben Bradlee remembered for invigorating journalismFor former Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, good journalism coincided with good timing
The Associated Press2 hours ago
In this Oct. 20, 2014, photo, former President Bill Clinton speaks at a campaign event for Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., background, in Baton Rouge, La., Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. Bill and HillaryRodham Clinton are the validators-in-chief for Democrats struggling through a bleak campaign season in states where President Barack Obama is deeply unpopular.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
The Clintons, the Democrats' 2014 super surrogatesBill and Hillary Clinton are playing a top surrogate role for Democrats in 2014
The Associated Press2 hours ago
Investigators question Secret Service assignmentGovernment investigators question 'problematic' Secret Service assignment to check on employee
The Associated Press3 hours ago
US gov't seeks supplies for immigration documentsSignal of Obama's plans? Government seeks supplies for millions more immigration documents
The Associated Press4 hours ago
This undated handout photo provided by Revolution shows Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden.   A longtime Democratic operative, Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)
Klain meets with Obama on first day as Ebola czarRon Klain to meet with Obama, top White House aides on first day as Ebola czar
The Associated Press6 hours ago
Bradlee recalled as a genius, great journalistFormer Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee recalled as one of nation's great journalists
The Associated Press6 hours ago
A newsman's life: Pentagon Papers to WatergateA newsman's life: lucky breaks, gutsy decisions marked Bradlee's career at Post
The Associated Press6 hours ago
FILE - This Oct. 27, 2013, file photo, shows former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords (D-Ariz.), at a fundraiser for U.S. Senate candidate Bruce Braley at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, Iowa. As the race between Rep. Ron Barber D- Ariz., who also was wounded in the 2011 shooting, and Republican Martha McSally has grown tighter in the final weeks before the Nov. 4, 2014, elections, Giffords is playing more of a role by appearing in ads and raising money for her former aide and increasingly turning the race into a debate about guns. (AP Photo/Scott Morgan, File)
Guns, Giffords play big role in Arizona House raceGabby Giffords and gun control play big role in tight US House race in southern Arizona
The Associated Press6 hours ago
This photo taken Oct. 4, 2014 shows scaffolding around the Capitol Dome in Washington. Two weeks before election day, the nation’s likely voters have started seeing eye-to-eye with the election prognosticators. Most now expect the Republican Party to take control of the U.S. Senate, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. And by a growing margin, more say that’s the outcome they’d like to see.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
AP-GfK Poll: 5 things to know about midterms pollAP-GfK Poll: 4 factors shaping the upcoming midterm election, and another that's not
The Associated Press6 hours ago
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