FILM REVIEW: THE PURGE

By Roger Moore 2014-08-28

Tribune Newspapers Critic

1 1/2 stars

James DeMonaco's "The Purge" is a bloody-minded, heavy-handed satire of life within these violent United States. It's a horror film with the occasional visceral thrill -- the fear of being hunted, the excitement of righteous violence against nameless intruders. But mostly, it's just a clumsy lecture about who we're becoming: haves versus have-nots, with the haves armed to the teeth.

In the not-too-distant future, "the New Founding Fathers" have decreed America has one night a year of catharsis, when citizens can give in to our most violent impulses. Murder and mayhem abound, and first responders have the night off.

Basically, you're on your own for "The Purge." The well-off can hunt the homeless, the "weak" and those who don't contribute to society. Or just seek revenge. Others -- whom we'll call "rich liberals" -- buy massive security systems and hunker down in their fortress McMansions for the night.

Ethan Hawke portrays one of the latter, a salesman who's gotten rich selling armored security systems. Lena Headey plays his resigned-to-this-yearly-purge wife. Max Burkholder and Adelaide Kane are the sensitive son and hormonal daughter whose trusting natures would thwart any security system.

That's because Zoey (Kane) has let the boyfriend dad forbids her to see into the house, and Charlie (Burkholder) rescues a homeless vet (Edwin Hodge) from a hunt. And that brings vengeful preppies (led by Rhys Wakefield) who were stalking the vet down on their happy home.

DeMonaco seems awfully concerned that we won't get his points here, so he gives us repetitious 24-hour TV coverage about how it is time to "release the beast and purge our American streets," and debates over the morality of it and on how "culling" society lowers unemployment and helps the economy.

You can see what Hawke and Headey envisioned in this -- the chance to make a statement for compassion and humanity in the face of the social Darwinism that might create a night like this.

But lapses in logic and characterization trip the movie up at every turn. This Charlie kid seems to have a death wish and a sense of removal from his supposed compassion that undercuts his supposed motivation. The boyfriend is underdeveloped. The family is armed, but their "plan" of defense laughably involves splitting up and searching for the wounded homeless man in their pitch-black house.

The reliably believable Hawke has had good luck in horror in recent years ("Sinister," "Daybreakers"), but his instincts fail him here. "The Purge" is an 85-minute chore that tediously plays like a real-time re-creation of the night of The Purge -- all 12 hours of it.

MPAA rating: R (for strong disturbing violence and some language).

Running time: 1:25.

Cast: Ethan Hawke (James); Lena Headey (Mary); Max Burkholder (Charlie); Adelaide Kane (Zoey).

Credits: Written and directed by James DeMonaco; produced by Andrew Form, Bradley Fuller, Jason Blum, Michael Bay and Sebastien Lemercier. A Universal Pictures release.

Back to Movie Details

Movie News

Lupita Nyong'o seeks Va. slave-trade preservation'12 Years a Slave' star Lupita Nyong'o adds her social media clout vs. Va. slave-trade park
The Associated Press21 hours ago
This image released by Film Movement shows Juliette Binoche, foreground, in a scene from, "A Thousand Times Goodnight." (AP Photo/Film Movement)
Binoche explores risks, passion of war photographyIn new film, Juliette Binoche explores the timely issue of danger facing war photojournalists
The Associated Press22 hours ago
Q&A: Anna Kendrick on modeling, movies and musicQ&A: Actress Anna Kendrick talks about modeling, movies and music
The Associated Press22 hours ago
Chan wants to be better father after son's arrestJackie Chan says he wants to be better father after his son's arrest on drug charge
The Associated Press1 day ago
FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014 file photo, U.S. directors, Don Hall, left, and Chris Williams of the film "Big Hero 6" attend a press conference to promote their animation film, starring Baymax,  the inflatable marshmallow-like robot, seen at left in the background, in Tokyo. Disney shows its love for Japan by setting the story in a picturesque town that’s a cross between Tokyo and San Francisco, San Fransokyo, complete with cable cars and futuristic trains. “Big Hero 6” opened the Tokyo Film Festival on Thursday night - the first Disney animation film to have its global premiere in Japan. It opens at theaters around the world in November and December. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
Disney pens love letter to Japan with robot filmDisney pens love letter to animation-loving Japan with robot film 'Big Hero 6'
The Associated Press1 day ago
Movie News